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November 18, 2013

Pakistan | Education

Pakistan: 94% of teachers lack English skills

The PIE (Professionals in International Education) News reports on British Council findings that show ongoing educational reforms in Punjab still have a very long way to go.

Ninety-four per cent of Pakistan’s primary and middle school teachers lack the necessary English language skills needed for providing a quality education in English, due to what a report from the British Council’s Punjab Education and English Language Initiative (PEELI) calls a lack of “buy-in” to the government’s policy to expand and improve English medium education.

Of the 2,008 teachers sampled from Punjab’s 18 districts, 62% of private and 56% of government school teachers scored in the lowest possible band in the Aptis test – a computer based competency test used by the British Council– indicating an inability to use familiar everyday expressions and simple phrases.

“We are committed to continuing to work with the School Education Department of the Government of Punjab to improve the situation for both teachers and learners and ensure that English medium education is of the highest possible quality,” said Richard Wyers, Director Punjab at the British Council.

Read the full article from The PIE News.

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September 17, 2013

Pakistan | Opinion

Pakistan: The politics of language teaching

teach-English-in-Pakistan.jpgThis opinion piece from a lecturer in English at Shaheed Benazir Bhutto University looks at the problems of outdated teaching methods and the continued perception of English as an imperialist language.

English Language is generally considered to be the legacy of British colonial rule in Pakistan and strangely, many political and religious leaders have time and again proposed the idea of doing away with English language and promote our own national language Urdu. They consider it to be the cultural invasion of Britain and America and all other English speaking countries in the world and make it a part of yet another of their conspiracy theories to contaminate the minds of Muslim youth with their literature and language.

What they fail to realize is that English is no more the Language of Britain as there are 750 millions of speakers of English(used as a foreign language) across the world as compared to 365 million speakers in Britain and all other English speaking countries, according to the British Council. English has grown in stature and importance with the advancement of Globalization, media and the internet. It is widely used in the world for business communication, political discourse and in academics. Roughly speaking, about 1428 books are daily published in the world, majority of which are written in English Language.

In Pakistan most of the people consider English to be a problem. One of the major hindrances in learning English is the traditional approach of teaching and unavailability of trained and qualified language teachers.

Read the full article from The Frontier Post.

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August 27, 2013

Pakistan | Teacher Development

Islamabad - ELT workshop for seminary teachers begins

pk.pngThe Express Tribune reports on an ELT workshop for Islamic scholars in Pakistan, led by international teaching trainer Don Johnson.

A two-week “Madaris Teachers’ English Training” workshop jointly by the International Islamic University Islamabad (IIUI) and the US embassy, Islamabad, kicked off here on Monday.

Renowned international teaching trainer Don Johnson from the US and Dean Faculty of Language and Literature, IIUI, Dr Munawar Iqbal Gondal are the resource persons while Student Affairs Adviser Dr Safeer Awan is coordinating the workshop, said a press release.

Around 40 seminary teachers from Gilgit Baltistan, Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Peshawar, Mohmand Agency, Malakand, Islamabad and other areas of the country are participating in the workshop.

The workshop includes communication language teaching, teaching pronunciation, vocabulary, lesson planning, teaching writing skills, teaching grammar and reading skills and interactive sessions to improve English language proficiency and pedagogy.

Read the full article from The Express Tribune.

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May 29, 2013

China | India | Nepal | Pakistan

1,000s of English teachers from Britain to teach in Asia

Teaching-English-in-US"Malaysia's The Star reports today on a plan to bring teachers from Britain to teach English in Asia.

Business conglomerate Melewar Group has joined forces with a British education recruitment specialist to send out native speaking English teachers from Britain to 14 countries in Asia to teach the language.

The first batch of teachers are expected to arrive in these countries in the third quarter of this year under an agreement signed between English Learning Group Ltd, a member of the Melewar Group, and STC Consortium Ltd here yesterday.

The teachers would be sent to South-East Asia as well as to Bangaladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.

Read the full story from The Star Online

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About Pakistan

This page contains an archive of all entries posted to ELT News in the Pakistan category. They are listed from newest to oldes.

Nepal is the previous category.

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