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February 10, 2010

GEOS announces free English lessons for students affected by the closing of its Australian schools

Australia.jpegMany students were left stranded when GEOS closed its eight schools in Australia at the end of January. GEOS has now offered all students affected by the closure of its Australian schools free lessons for six months at any of its schools in Japan.

Let's Japan commented: 'GEOS's announcement of free lessons is worse than a half measure: It costs them nothing while it will cost any non-Japanese student taking up GEOS's offer everything. They will have to pay for their flight to Japan, arrange a visa and accommodations on their own, and probably have to find a part-time job, too. Since these students probably don't speak Japanese and their visas may not allow it, finding a job will be difficult if not impossible. Moreover, why would they want to work in a job that will require them to interact in Japanese? It's also not clear how many hours a week they will be studying. One or two classes a week will do nothing to improve their language skills. GEOS's offer is really no offer at all. At best, it's a way for GEOS to look like it's acting in good faith when it really isn't. '

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